Take the long take

The experiential processes of film makers and spectators triggered by unedited shots

Participants

Cooperation between:

Katrin Heimann (Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Christian Suhr (Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Henrik Hojer (VIA Aarhus)

 
Funding

Interacting Minds Center, Trapholt Museum

 
Contact

Katrin Heimann <katrinheimann@gmail.com>

Christian Suhr <suhr@cas.au.dk>

Status

Ongoing

 

Summary

A common hypothesis about long takes is that they create a special presence and access to social reality due to the unbroken continuity of space and time (Bazin 1967: 28; Kissel 2008; Grimshaw and Ravetz 2009; Rattee 2012). In addition, it has been argued that long takes allow participants a specific mode of free viewing in which the attention of spectators wanders freely and independent thoughts and meta-thoughts arise (see MacDougall 1992: 37). Consequently, long takes have been applied by with a political aim by ethnographic filmmakers to allow viewers “to see and judge for themselves” without interruptions or filmic manipulation. Also in european art house cinema long takes play a role. In this study we are using experimental material from ethnographic film, as well as from fiction film to for the first time investigate the actual effect of this device when it comes to experience. For this purpose, MP interviews are combined with eye-tracking data. Pilot results will first be presented at the Conference of the Cognitive Study of the Moving Images in Hamburg, June 2019.

 

Updated on 4/4/2019

Catch me if you can

A micro-phenomenological investigation of aesthetic attraction in the museum context

Participants

Cooperation between:

Katrin Heimann (Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Karen Grøn (Trapholt Museum, Denmark)

Joerg Fingerhut (HU Berlin)

Funding

Interacting Minds Center and Trapholt Museum

 
Contact

Katrin Heimann <katrinheimann@gmail.com>

Status

Ongoing

 

Summary

Visiting an art exhibition is a cognitive challenge: It is impossible to attend adequately to all art works. Visitors therefore watch selectively, a fact that points to a decision process that is of high interests especially for museum disseminators and curators. How do we choose the pictures we attend closer to? In this pilot study we collected first data on the experience of museum visitors illuminating this question.

Updated on 4/4/2019

The body as a locus for the experience of museum and architectural spaces

Participants

PhD student: Marcus Weisen 

Thesis advisor: Claire Petitmengin

 

Status

started 11/2015

 

Summary

This doctoral research investigates sensory, emotional, aesthetical and cognitive dimensions of bodily experience in the encounter between visitors and museum spaces. This experience is of a largely pre-reflective nature and gives rise to “sensory thought” according to thinking in art and architecture inspired by phenomenology. For this research, we will use the micro-phenomenological interview method that enables precise descriptions of the pre-reflective dimension of experience, to collect accounts of lived experience of museum spaces and to identify their underlying structure. The research will provide empirical verification of hypotheses formulated in phenomenological writings about architecture.

Updated on 1/12/2016

Participants

Fergus Anderson (Alanus University, Germany)
Hanne Bess Boelsbjerg (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

Kiku Day (Aarhus University, Denmark)
Karen Gron (Museum director at Trapholt Museum of Modern Art and Design, Denmark)
Emily Hammond (School of Psychology , University of Exeter, UK)
Justin Kelley (Rice University, US)

Anne C. Klein / Rigzin Drolma (Rice University & Dawn Mountain, US)
Eva Kreikenbaum (Basel University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland)

Jennifer Obbard (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Elsa Oliarj Ines (Film maker, Paris)

Kiki Palmer (Kristianstad University, Sweden)
Claire Petitmengin (Archives Husserl, ENS Paris, France)

Bruna Petreca (Royal College of Art, London, UK & Centro Universitário Belas Artes de São Paulo, Brazil)
Mary Rees (Saybrook University, US)

Donata Schoeller (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
Mette Steenberg (IMC - Aarhus University, Denmark)

Gregory Walkerden (Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia)
Marcus Weisen (ENS Paris, France)

 

Funding

Self-funding and Interactive Minds Center

 

Status

Completed

 

Summary

The goal of the project is to conduct a pilot study on the experience of encountering a work of art. During a one-week workshop (26-30 September 2016), eighteen researchers trained in micro-phenomenological methods visited the exhibition of Olafur Eliasson in the chateau and park of Versailles (June-September 2016), and then made micro-phenomenological descriptions of particularly significant moments of this visit, which resulted in a synthesis document. 

Publication

Synthesis document "Touching / Being touched by art".

Updated on 10/3/2017

Participants

PhD student: Bruna Petreca (Royal College of Art)

Supervisors: Prof. Dr. Sharon Baurley (RCA) and Prof. Dr. Nadia Bianchi-Berthouze (UCLIC)

 

Mode of funding

CNPq – Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, Ministry for Science and Technology of Brazil (CNPq), within the Science without Borders programme.

 

Status

Completed (June 2016)

 

Summary

The textile selection is a crucial part of the design process, for which there is no systematic understanding and no support in place from the designer experience perspective. In the selection, designers need to synthesise technical information, their sensory and affective experience around textiles, and its related meanings. However, currently the textile industry just provides methods to describe, measure, or predict the properties of textiles perceptible to hand manipulation: methods that only partially support the designer. The thesis addresses this gap by contributing new understanding of when and how the textile selection happens in the design process, uncovering tacit processes and embodied aspects integral to it, and secondly, by developing a toolkit to support the designer experience when selecting. The Micro-phenomenology approach was brought in to explore the embodied aspects of textiles selection emerging as significant through my previous studies on tactile experience in more depth, using the ‘Micro-phenomenological Interview’ (Petitmengin, 2006) method to obtain a first-person verbal description of experiential processes. The latter revealed 3 types of touch behaviour and 3 tactile-based phases of the textile selection process, and their dynamics. The findings from the interviews were later used as input for designing ‘The sCrIPT Toolkit’, comprised of instructions that facilitate focus and elaboration of the textile experience in the textiles selection.

 

Publications

Petreca B. 2016. An understanding of embodied textile selection processes and a toolkit to support them. Thesis. Royal College of Art.

Petreca B., Bianchi-Berthouze N., Baurley S. 2015. How Do Designers Feel Textiles? In: Proceedings ACII’ 15. IEEE.

Updated on 16/01/2017

Participants

Bruna Petreca, Art Direction

Paula Petreca, Direction and choreography

 

Mode of funding

ProAC – Programa de Ação Cultural da Secretaria da Cultura do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil – (funded through PROAC call 04/2015)

 

Status

Finished (August 2016)

 

Summary

The Diptych of The Crowds (“Díptico das Multidões”) is formed by two choreographies (Cosmos & Axis) that investigated the city's lanscapes and the construction of urban bodies, the places of pause and the changes of journey, while asking how "we can be so many and be together, without uniformity."

In this project Bruna Petreca has used micro-phenomenologcal interviews technique as a means to tap into the dancers perceptions and discover means to express these materially collaborating to the dance expression. These interviews served as a basis to develop the concept of the art direction and supported greatly the costume design. Throughout the exchange process, the dancers also revealed that the process supported their own creative process.

 

Communications about choreographies

http://www.abcdmaior.com.br/materias/cultura/alem-de-batalhas-de-mcs-praca-da-matriz-tambem-e-palco-para-danca

http://idanca.net/projeto-co-estreia-novo-trabalho-em-pracas-do-abc-paulista/

http://www.dgabc.com.br/Noticia/2007493/social-do-diario-danca-na-praca-incentiva-arte-em-santo-andre

https://catracalivre.com.br/sp/spetaculo/barato/satyrianas-2016-danca-circo-e-performance- invadem-roosevelt/

 

Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-p6R-7tr-o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7QoxvCfKIk&t=1243s

Updated on 16/01/2017

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Olafur Eliasson, Fog assembly, Versailles, 2016

Photo Claire Petitmengin